How to Boost the Confidence of Girls (and Boys)

Concerned about your teen's self confidence?  The  irony about confidence is that it comes from serving a higher purpose, not the ego.  Teach your teen to get outside themselves and work for the greater good of their school team, church, friendships, and most importantly, their families.  

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Accept that your teen is a sexual being if you want to build rapport and trust

Now, I am not suggesting that you encourage your child to have sex.  What I am suggesting is that if you want to have an easy rapport with your teen and you want your teen to trust you, you need to completely accept that your teen is a sexual being, even if your teen is not sexually active.  Why is this necessary?  Because when you ignore this reality, you will overtly or unconsciously communicate a message to your teen that you do not accept his or her maturation, that you still see your teen as a child.  And this message will cause your teen to resent you because your denial about your teen’s maturation leads him or her to feel guilt and shame about what is a basic biological reality:  all people are sexual beings.  Click below to read more about how to communicate your values about sex to your teen.

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“Mom, Dad – I’m gay” How to Respond in a Way that Builds Rapport and Trust

What should you do if your teen “comes out” to you as gay or you suspect that your teen might be attracted to the same sex or experimenting with sexual orientation?  If you want to build rapport and trust with your teen, which is the foundation to having a successful relationship with your child far into his adulthood, then you will approach conversation with your teen about sexual orientation the same way you would approach any other conversation – using the three essential steps to building rapport and trust with your teen:  respect the life stage called adolescence; remember what it was like to be a teen; and accept that your child is becoming an adult. 

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Concerned about Your Teen’s Boyfriend or Girlfriend? How to Intervene Without Alienating Your Teen

In my last post I talked about the importance of parents accepting that “teen love is real love.”  All that being said, your teen is still a child, growing slowing into adulthood; as such, he or she still needs your guidance when it comes to relationships, especially in the area of setting healthy boundaries.  Click below to read more on how to help your teen set boundaries when it comes to dating. 

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Teen Love is Real Love

Remembering what it was like to be a teenager is essential when you begin to navigate conversations with your child about dating and relationships.  Unfortunately, parents do just the opposite.  They forget how seriously they took their relationships as a teen.  They forget the heart fluttering feelings of first love and the devastating, heart-rending let down when that relationship came to an end.  The first love, the first kiss, and the first sexual experience are all very powerful rites of passage that stay with people well into their adulthood.  Click below to read more about how to honor your teen’s feelings while mentoring your teen in how to set healthy boundaries when dating.

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